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Preston Wadley

Preston Wadley

PENTIMENTO

June 24 – August 20, 2006

Pentimento – the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms, or strokes that have been changed and painted over.

My work uses the book as a purely visual iconographic artifact, in which it is the image, structure, and materials are that are the content. Although their pages may not turn or act like the traditional books we are accustomed to, they are about the very essence of what books mean to us. They have escaped their expected function.

The simple physical presence of a book speaks to knowledge preserved and communicated. Despite the absence of written text, my work is an attempt to provide a close, warm, and unique conversation with an individual. My books are evidence of change, a type of historical revision – a “Pentimento”, reflecting on the connection to what has already been, and an ever-evolving present.

Preston Wadley is an artist and educator working in Washington State. He received his MFA from the University of Washington and is currently a professor at the Cornish College of Art in Seattle, WA. His work has been shown extensively in galleries across Washington, including G. Gibson Gallery, Seattle Art Museum, and debuted on the east coast at En Foco in NYC this spring. In addition to his exhibit at CPW this year, Wadley’s work will be exhibited at Blue Sky Gallery in Portland, OR in November. Preston is the recipient of a NEA Goodwill Games Arts Festival grant, a Seattle Arts Commission grant, and Teacher of the Year award from Cornish College. His work has been published in Nueva Luz Photographic Journal, Seattle Post Intelligencer, Seattle Times, and Artweek. He completed a residency here at CPW in the summer of 2005.

prestonwadley.com

Made in Woodstock III

MADE IN WOODSTOCK III

coordinated by Liz Glynn and Ariel Shanberg

January 28 – March 26, 2006

What distinguishes an artist’s work as “Made in Woodstock”? 

What impact does place truly have in influencing artists and their work? Woodstock and the surrounding Hudson Valley/Catskill Mountain Region have attracted artists for over a century – from painters to sculptors, from filmmakers to musicians, from writers to craft makers, among others. Whether the time they spent here lasted a couple of days or a number of years, this place has fostered some of the most moving and significant art we know today.

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MWIII, the third installment of Made In Woodstock, the Center for Photography at Woodstock’s exhibition series highlighting works by recent artists-in-residence, celebrates Woodstock’s identity. The eight image-makers featured participated in the Center’s residency program, WOODSTOCK A-I-R in 2003 & 2004. Designed to provide not only the time and space, but also vital critical, technical, and financial support for artists of color working in the photographic arts, WOODSTOCK A-I-R has hosted over 30 artists since 1999. During residencies of two – four weeks, artists are afforded the freedom to focus solely on their artistic growth. This time has allowed many to complete ongoing projects, initiate new ones, and move their unique visions forward. Staying at the Villetta Inn within the Byrdcliffe Art Colony and working in CPW’s traditional and digital darkrooms, they experience both Woodstock’s historic identity as a colony of the arts and enrich the diversity of those who have found inspiration among Woodstock’s surroundings.

While the term “artist of color” was once seen as potentially limiting – causing audiences to have a narrow field in which to understand the artist’s work – today that identity signifies an awareness of history and its visual representation, coupled with a willingness to explore the past and construct new images for the world today. As evidenced by many of the artworks in this show, one’s personal attachment to a place has become an increasingly complex notion in a globalized world. The contemporary artist is often faced with sustaining their practice through various workspace residency programs. These opportunities lead them to all four-corners of the world, sustaining their practice while inserting them within environments and communities often remarkably different from their own. The works in this exhibition reflect each of the artists’ experiences and the significant impact these surroundings made on them; and while some of the work included in this exhibition was not physically completed at CPW, for many, the ideas generated during their residencies reverberated for months after. As a result, the artists in MWII reflect a number of characteristics inherent in work made in Woodstock – sincere artistic expression, deep interest in one’s past and surroundings, and groundbreaking scope and practice of the medium. 

– Liz Glynn & Ariel Shanberg, 2006

Ariel Shanberg has served as the Executive Director of CPW since 2003. Liz Glynn worked as the Center’s Program Associate from 2004 to 2005.

[one_half first]"Made in Woodstock III", coordinated by Liz Glynn and Ariel Shanberg, CPW, January 28 - March 26, 2006 Kenseth Armstead[/one_half]

[one_half]"Made in Woodstock III", coordinated by Liz Glynn and Ariel Shanberg, CPW, January 28 - March 26, 2006Myra Greene[/one_half]

[one_half first]"Made in Woodstock III", coordinated by Liz Glynn and Ariel Shanberg, CPW, January 28 - March 26, 2006Kira Lynn Harris[/one_half]

[one_half]"Made in Woodstock III", coordinated by Liz Glynn and Ariel Shanberg, CPW, January 28 - March 26, 2006Priya Kambli[/one_half]

[one_half first]"Made in Woodstock III", coordinated by Liz Glynn and Ariel Shanberg, CPW, January 28 - March 26, 2006Keisha Scarville[/one_half]

[one_half]"Made in Woodstock III", coordinated by Liz Glynn and Ariel Shanberg, CPW, January 28 - March 26, 2006Sun-Joo Shin[/one_half]

[one_half first]"Made in Woodstock III", coordinated by Liz Glynn and Ariel Shanberg, CPW, January 28 - March 26, 2006Noelle Tan[/one_half]

[one_half]"Made in Woodstock III", coordinated by Liz Glynn and Ariel Shanberg, CPW, January 28 - March 26, 2006Martin Weber[/one_half]

Made in Woodstock II

MADE IN WOODSTOCK II

work by CPW’s 2001  & 2002 artists-in-residence

June 6 – August 10, 2003

This exhibition presents works by photographers who participated in CPW’s residency program for artists of color, WOODSTOCK A-I-R in 2001 & 2002.

Recognizing the special quality of our region, the Center for Photography at Woodstock, with generous support from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, the National Endowment of the Arts and the New York State Council on the Arts, began WOODSTOCK A-I-R in 1999. By providing our residents with workspace, housing in the Byrdcliffe Artist Colony, stipends for food and travel, honorarium, critical support, and most especially, time, they have the opportunity to focus on expressing that which is internal by distancing them from the distracting hustle of their daily lives. With that gift, they have gone on and given us a gift of their own. Often inspired by our everyday surroundings, they have interwoven their ideas with Woodstock, the Catskills, and the Hudson Valley; and allowed us to see our everyday world through their eyes. In doing so they have honored and continued the tradition of art made in Woodstock.

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Annu Palakunnathu Matthew’s diptychs call into question our reliance on historic imagery and plays with levels of fact and fiction by appropriating the aesthetic and tactics of Edward Curtis. Felicia Megginson responded so strongly to the presence of the Catskills that her initial plans where scrapped and pursuing her internal instincts created the series Communion, which explores the relationship between her individual and cultural/racial relationship with nature. Yancey Hughes, a long time commercial photographer turns his camera on us, seeking to separate the single person during the busiest times of pedestrian traffic in New York City. Tulu Bayar’s multi-media project Aphorisms seeks out amidst layers of visual and audio “white noise”, the role of personal spirituality for three women, one Jewish, one Muslim and one Christian.

Hong-An Truong’s photographic light boxes present images she photographed on her first trip back to Viet Nam with transcribed text sewn into the print – reminding us of the ongoing struggle to understand a place and people distant to us through word and image.

Terry Boddie’s series Stasis combines sonogram imagery of his children with personal and cultural documentation relating to his Caribbean origins bringing the past, present and future onto the same plane. Stephen Marc’s ongoing exploration of the African Diaspora is seen in his digital montages, combining historic sites relating to the Underground Railroad in New York with imagery of contemporary African-Americans that reveals the connecting threads of history preserved in such things as fraternity gestures and hair weaving patterns. Fascinated by the subtle poetic effects of lights’ impact on surface, Mayumi Terada constructs scale models, which once “impregnated” by light and captured through her camera’s lens, fill our minds with sensual wonder and curiosity.

Like Truong, Howard Henry Chen returned to Vietnam, having left with his family after over 25 years of life in the US. Chen’s images seek to re-imag-ine a place and people whose identity has been frozen in western culture’s collective memory through photographs and film clips from the Vietnam War. In her intimate photo-based works, Dorothy Imagire offers the viewer a chance to consider ideas surrounding the term exotic and how women of color negotiate the issues surrounding western standards of beauty and identity and balance them with their ethnic, religious, and cultural backgrounds. And in Moonching Wu‘s ongoing photographic exploration of water and our relationship to this precious resource, we are provided an opportunity to consider its presence in the heavens, the earth, and sea.

-Ariel Shanberg, 2003

Ariel Shanberg has served as the Executive Director of CPW since 2003.

This exhibition has been made possible in part by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York State Arts Council, and the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Special thanks to the Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art at SUNY New Paltz for the loan of display cases and to the artists in this exhibition whose presence and creativity continuously inspires all that we do at CPW.

 

[one_half first]Made in Woodstock II, work by CPW's 2001 & 2002 Artists in Residence, June 6 - August 10, 2003Tulu Bayar[/one_half] [one_half]Made in Woodstock II, work by CPW's 2001 & 2002 Artists in Residence, June 6 - August 10, 2003Terry Boddie[/one_half] [one_half first]Made in Woodstock II, work by CPW's 2001 & 2002 Artists in Residence, June 6 - August 10, 2003Howard Henry Chen[/one_half] [one_half]Made in Woodstock II, work by CPW's 2001 & 2002 Artists in Residence, June 6 - August 10, 2003Yancey Hughes[/one_half] [one_half first]Made in Woodstock II, work by CPW's 2001 & 2002 Artists in Residence, June 6 - August 10, 2003Dorthy Imagire[/one_half] [one_half]Made in Woodstock II, work by CPW's 2001 & 2002 Artists in Residence, June 6 - August 10, 2003Stephen Marc[/one_half] [one_half first]Made in Woodstock II, work by CPW's 2001 & 2002 Artists in Residence, June 6 - August 10, 2003Annu Palakunnathu Matthew[/one_half] [one_half]Made in Woodstock II, work by CPW's 2001 & 2002 Artists in Residence, June 6 - August 10, 2003Felicia Megginson[/one_half] [one_half first]Made in Woodstock II, work by CPW's 2001 & 2002 Artists in Residence, June 6 - August 10, 2003Mayumi Terada[/one_half] [one_half]Made in Woodstock II, work by CPW's 2001 & 2002 Artists in Residence, June 6 - August 10, 2003Hong-An Truong[/one_half] [one_half first]Made in Woodstock II, work by CPW's 2001 & 2002 Artists in Residence, June 6 - August 10, 2003Moonching Wu[/one_half]

 

Howard Henry Chen

Howard Henry Chen

MY VIETNAM

March 29 – May 25, 2003

I have spent the last few years living and photographing in Vietnam. It was a heady time to be there as a young Vietnamese American who came of age in the United States, as I witnessed changing social and political sensibilities and the demanding reach of economic and cultural globalism.

Before I first arrived in 2000, after having lived in the United States for twenty-five years, I had originally wanted to document certain projects ­–– photographing the lingering effects of unexploded ordnance, for example, or Agent Orange, or a fledgling market economy in a nominally Communist state. These ideas were born from my training as a journalist and an abiding interest in historical and geopolitical issues. When I arrived, I discovered that these issues didn’t interest me as much as a need to explore, visually, a sense of my own identity, and to see my own version of Vietnam. I wanted to visually interpret for myself a place that others had always visually interpreted for me, to use a new visual grammar that could sit alongside images of Vietnam to which I have grown accustomed: of an Orientalist’s fantasy of smiling rice farmers and water buffalo in verdant paddies, or the famous combat images of decades past. Americans usually think about Vietnam as a series of anniversaries frozen in time: the anniversary of this or that military offensive, or this or that incident of violence or protest. The Vietnamese have moved on in a way that always amazed me, and it was this sense of radiant stillness and strength with which I identified and photographed.

Spending time with and making portraits of young Vietnamese born after the end of the war –– farmers, students, idealistic entrepreneurs, novice monks, young professionals, young Communists, ethnic minorities –– has helped me recreate my own vision of Vietnam. I saw subtle and profound changes, even in the relatively short period of time I lived there, and these are portraits of the demographic that is effecting the most change, and is most affected by it. I always asked my close Vietnamese friends and relatives if I could photograph them. Many of them are not much younger than I, and I asked this always remembering that were it not for some pluck and a bit of good fortune –– nothing more –– it could have been me on the other side of the lens. In any case, here we were, taking pictures, trying to redefine how Vietnamese people should be seen, and this collaboration was so elegant to me, as neither the photographer nor the subject have any memories whatsoever of the war.

The pictures also, to me, recall simple holiday snapshots taken by Vietnamese of our parents’ generation, standing stiffly and formally in front of canh dep –– a pretty background –– while a war mushroomed around them. This simplicity belies the palpable, almost aggressive, sense of hope and unfettered optimism within this demographic at this point in time. The features ­­–– of both the faces and the landscape –– are the same, but the history is different.

-Howard Henry Chen, 2003

Howard Henry Chen was born in Saigon, Viet Nam in 1972 and left for the United States with his family in 1975, a few weeks before the tanks rolled in. He grew up in Pennsylvania and studied journalism and political science at Boston University. He then worked as a journalist at several newspapers, covering, among other subjects, the television industry and the changing demographics of the American South. He first studied photography at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, where he sharpened his interest in cultural hybridity and produced a project on second-generation Vietnamese in the American South. He won the first Fulbright fellowship given in photography to Viet Nam in 1999, and has spent the last six years shuttling back and forth doing photographic work. He will receive his MFA from Columbia College in 2006. His most recent exhibit was at The Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago, where he and his wife currently live. Chen was an artist-in-residence at CPW in 2001.

howardhenrychen.com

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