Photography Now 2017 – Zora J Murff

Artist Interview

This is an open series of interviews with the artists in the Photography Now 2017 exhibition.

ZORA J MURFF – http://www.zora-murff.com/

See interview...

Zora J Murff: Levi at 15, 2015

1. Where are you from, and what is your background in photography? How did you get into photography?

I am from Des Moines, IA, and have been practicing photography professionally for about five years. I began taking photographs as a hobby, and completely fell in love with it. I decided that is what I wanted to spend the rest of my life doing, so I enrolled in a BFA program. I am currently in my final year as an MFA student.

2. What inspired you to make the work in Photography Now 2017? What is the work about? Please describe one piece, the evolution of the concept, and the process?

I started my series Corrections while I was completing my undergraduate studies. I was enrolled in an Advanced Photography course and we were tasked with making a cohesive body of work. I was employed by a juvenile detention facility at the time, and decided to make my series about the kids and their experiences in the system. The series as a whole uses photography as a way to reflect on stigmatization and perception through how we look at and judge individuals contextually. One of the pieces, Lucas at 15, depicts a young man on his bike, his head resting on the handlebars. All of the portraiture that comprises the series was a collaboration between me and the person depicted. I was required to keep kids’ identities anonymous, and so I always approached making images of them in a way that would keep their personhood intact, while highlighting their unique personalities. Lucas, which is a pseudonym, was always building bikes from scraps and traded parts. He was very talented at this, and was a skill he took pride in. We talked about what the bikes meant to him, and he saw them as a symbol of freedom and independence. Given that he was in a system designed to strip him of his individuality and freedom, We thought his static posture juxtaposed with a symbol of mobility made a strong statement about the growing pains of adolescence and the stagnation he felt while on probation.

3. Much of the work in Photography Now 2017 seems to describe a distance between the subject and the viewer, a disconnection, and/or a dystopian situation. How do you think your work relates to these ideas?

The juvenile criminal justice system is all about distance. When kids are incarcerated, they are physically distance from their family, friends, and communities. There is also a distance between how they want to be seen and how others seem them. I wanted this gap to manifest between the viewer and subject as well. Without context, the viewer is unable to know that these kids are in some sort of trouble, but viewing the portraits with the information I have provided makes them have to consider their own value judgements when it comes to people who are tagged “criminals”.

4. What are you working on now?

My work has shifted from studying the role photography plays in the criminal justice system to how images are used to establish and reinforce stereotypes of African-American individuals to justify oppression. My current research focuses on redlining: unfair housing policies implemented by the federal government. These practices were predicated through systemic white supremacy, and I use photography as a way to interpret them as a form of unseen violence. I represent this dire societal issue through photographing the landscape and architecture of redlined neighborhoods, those who inhabit them, and by referencing the tumultuous historic violence spurred by racism that has often affected these places.

5. What is the one photograph you always wanted to make but never could?

A successful self-portrait.


General exhibition information:

Photography Now 2017
November 4, 2017 – January 14, 2018
Juried by William Ewing

Featured Artists: Lars AndersonSarah AnthonyBen ArnonSandra BacchiJohn BarnardEmily BerlAdam Bernard, Christopher Paul Brown, Tianqiutao Chen, Jennifer Garza-CuenOrestes GonzalezTamar GranovskyAlejandro Loureiro LorenzoJeanette MayZora MurffLaurie PeekCeaphas Stubbs and Ayumi Tanaka.

See full exhibition information or exhibition guide (issuu.com).

Photography Now 2017 – Christopher Paul Brown

Artist Interview

This is an open series of interviews with the artists in the Photography Now 2017 exhibition.

CHRISTOPHER PAUL BROWN – www.christopherpaulbrown.com

See interview...

Christopher Paul Brown: Katrin as Japanese Girl at Futuristic Store, 06-30-2016

1. Where are you from, and what is your background in photography? How did you get into photography?

I was born in Dubuque, IA, and moved to an area 50 miles NW of Chicago at age eight. I got my first camera at around age 9. At age 22 I got serious and bought a quality 35 mm and taught myself darkroom techniques. While I have been active in music and film since my teenage years, photography remained my primary solitary art. In 2014 I began shooting with models and simultaneously let go of music and video in order to concentrate on the creation and promotion of my photography.

2. What inspired you to make the work in Photography Now 2017? What is the work about? Please describe one piece, the evolution of the concept, and the process?

Model Katrin Dohse and I went to a semi-abandoned open air warehouse near my home. Beneath one of two unwalled but roofed structures we shot with the intention of capitalizing on the polarity of obscure/reveal. As Katrin twirled amidst stacks of crafted wood on a dirt floor, she held in her hands a silk shawl. I shot rapidly with a shutter speed just slow enough to allow some blurring. I find that using polarities, such as intent/openness and obscure/reveal, allows alchemical energies to be released. Serendipity and syncrhonicity begin to manifest. I continued with this in post-production and superimposed one image on another. Playing with layering and other manipulations I used obscure/reveal once again to manifest the final image. Often this process is largely unconscious; the end result is more like a found artifact than a planned creation of my own.

3. Much of the work in Photography Now 2017 seems to describe a distance between the subject and the viewer, a disconnection, and/or a dystopian situation. How do you think your work relates to these ideas?

Because my work is subterranean and unconscious it is like a shard of a half remembered dream. Like a Rohrshach test, there are many interpretations. My ony interest is in feeling the flow of alchemical energies. I don’t bring mental or societal concepts to my work.

4. What are you working on now?

I shoot very little during the winter and use the time to catch up on processing previous shoots. At this moment I am near the end of a 9-24-2016 shoot titled Shuffling Feet. It is a sort of dancing by model Dohse, shot head to toe, but with an emphasis on shuffling feet. Much of the shooting is on a dusty road.

5. What is the one photograph you always wanted to make but never could?

I have always wanted to shoot in zero-G with a black background.


General exhibition information:

Photography Now 2017
November 4, 2017 – January 14, 2018
Juried by William Ewing

Featured Artists: Lars AndersonSarah AnthonyBen ArnonSandra BacchiJohn BarnardEmily BerlAdam Bernard, Christopher Paul Brown, Tianqiutao Chen, Jennifer Garza-CuenOrestes GonzalezTamar GranovskyAlejandro Loureiro LorenzoJeanette MayZora MurffLaurie PeekCeaphas Stubbs and Ayumi Tanaka.

See full exhibition information or exhibition guide (issuu.com).

Photography Now 2017 – Sandra Bacchi

Artist Interview

This is an open series of interviews with the artists in the Photography Now 2017 exhibition.

SANDRA BACCHI – http://sandrabacchi.com/

See interview...

Sandra Bacchi – We Are All in This Together #12, 2016

1. Where are you from, and what is your background in photography? How did you get into photography?

I’m from São Paulo, Brazil. I earned my degree in photography at Escola Panamericana de Artes, in 1997. After graduation, I transitioned my focus to cinematography. I worked with experienced directors of photography, first as an assistant, and later on my own projects. In 2001, I attended the Hungarian International Cinematography Workshop D.O.P., taught by Academy Award winner Vilmos Zsigmond and Laszlo Kovacs. It was a life-changing experience for me! In 2012, I moved to NYC with my family and finally returned to my roots, studying photography at International Center of Photography. My parents were filmmakers, so making images and telling stories was part of my childhood. Looking through the viewfinder of my mother’s camera was always magical and mysterious to me. When I was 19 years-old, she gave me her camera and I discovered that photography was not only my passion, but also my way to relate to the world around me.

2. What inspired you to make the work in Photography Now 2017? What is the work about? Please describe one piece, the evolution of the concept, and the process?

We Are All in This Together explores the characteristics of different individuals and the relationships between them while sharing the busiest public spaces in New York City – the subway trains. I’m fascinated by the thin line that divides what is public and what is private in a public space. We Are in All This Together #2 piece, for instance, emphasizes the commonalities between genders and in the everyday behaviors of people commuting in the subway. The pictures were taken without the subjects’ knowledge, in order to achieve the desired spontaneity. I used the camera on my mobile phone to blend more seamlessly into the environment. I took close to 3,200 pictures, during a six month period. The idea of not revealing the faces and to have a respectful ethnology point of view was always planned; but, most other decisions were made while I was editing the images each week. Along the way, I refined the “rules” I used while shooting, such as my position in the train, the times of the day and the week, and the color of the trains’ seats. I learned to wait for the moments when the train was not moving, in order to achiever a sharper image. But the serendipity was my strongest ally for sure! Typology was definitely the best way for me to share my view. Sequencing and processing the photos were the most challenging part of the process.

3. Much of the work in Photography Now 2017 seems to describe a distance between the subject and the viewer, a disconnection, and/or a dystopian situation. How do you think your work relates to these ideas?

By focusing on the lower portion of the subjects’ bodies, I directed the viewers’ attention to body language and physical details, revealing a glimpse of each subject’s personality. By doing that, I intentionally help the viewers to disconnect from the more natural habit of assessing others by their faces.

4. What are you working on now?

I am editing and processing a work I photographed over the summer in Hungary. It’s about my search for my identity and my origins, tracing a connection between my childhood and my daughters’ childhood. My father was Hungarian and going back to where he was born helped me make peace with his death. I am also editing new photos for the Watermelons Are Not Strawberries series and started a research on a new project about self-identity.

5. What is the one photograph you always wanted to make but never could?

When initially pursuing photography, my dream was to become a National Geographic photographer. I wanted to travel the world capturing its people, places and nature. Even though I pursued my personal dream of traveling, my professional career went to a different direction.


General exhibition information:

Photography Now 2017
November 4, 2017 – January 14, 2018
Juried by William Ewing

Featured Artists: Lars AndersonSarah AnthonyBen ArnonSandra BacchiJohn BarnardEmily BerlAdam Bernard, Christopher Paul Brown, Tianqiutao Chen, Jennifer Garza-CuenOrestes GonzalezTamar GranovskyAlejandro Loureiro LorenzoJeanette MayZora MurffLaurie PeekCeaphas Stubbs and Ayumi Tanaka.

See full exhibition information or exhibition guide (issuu.com).

Photography Now 2017 – Jeanette May

Artist Interview

This is an open series of interviews with the artists in the Photography Now 2017 exhibition.

JEANETTE MAY – http://www.jeanettemay.com/

See interview...

Jeanette May – Red Phone, 2016

1. Where are you from, and what is your background in photography? How did you get into photography?

I grew up in a small town near Chicago, IL. As an undergrad I studied painting, but quickly fell in love with the immediacy (compared to painting) of photography. I went on to earn an MFA in Photography from CalArts. Although I work exclusively in photography now, I function more like a painter.

2. What inspired you to make the work in Photography Now 2017? What is the work about? Please describe one piece, the evolution of the concept, and the process?

I began the Tech Vanitas photo series in order to address our anxiety around new technology and love for beautifully designed, obsolete technology. I gather an ever-expanding collection of commonplace technology and arrange them into precarious still lifes. I use strobe lights and digital photography to capture a coffee percolator and film camera teetering atop a shiny boombox that spews magnetic tape across the keys of an Underwood typewriter. My background in painting is clearly evident in my reference to 17th Century Dutch vanitas paintings, including the quality of light and color in my photos. At the same time, the compositions and artfully designed arrangements hint at contemporary product photography and advertising imagery. Finally, these photos are filled with nostalgia for old technology and yearning for the latest must-have enchanted objects.

3. Much of the work in Photography Now 2017 seems to describe a distance between the subject and the viewer, a disconnection, and/or a dystopian situation. How do you think your work relates to these ideas?

I don’t see my work as dystopian…filled with anxiety, yes.

4. What are you working on now?

I continue to work on the Tech Vanitas project. I’m still borrowing, renting, and occasionally buying, objects to photograph. I recently changed my format from vertical stacking to horizontal tumbling disarray.

5. What is the one photograph you always wanted to make but never could?

I have no answer to this question.


General exhibition information:

Photography Now 2017
November 4, 2017 – January 14, 2018
Juried by William Ewing

Featured Artists: Lars Anderson, Sarah Anthony, Ben Arnon, Sandra Bacchi, John BarnardEmily Berl, Adam Bernard, Christopher Paul Brown, Tianqiutao Chen, Jennifer Garza-Cuen, Orestes Gonzalez, Tamar Granovsky, Alejandro Loureiro Lorenzo, Jeanette May, Zora Murff, Laurie Peek, Ceaphas Stubbs and Ayumi Tanaka.

See full exhibition information or exhibition guide (issuu.com).

Photography Now 2017 – Ceaphas Stubbs

Artist Interview

This is an open series of interviews with the artists in the Photography Now 2017 exhibition.

CEAPHAS STUBBS – http://www.ceaphas.com/

See interview...

Ceaphas Stubbs – Tongue Tied, 2014

1. Where are you from, and what is your background in photography? How did you get into photography?
I am from New Jersey. My background in photography has always been connected with my background in painting and sculpture. I got into photography my Junior year at Rutgers University when I took Photo I as an elective. I was drawn to photography because I realized there were things I could do faster and more efficiently in this medium versus painting or sculpture.

2. What inspired you to make the work in Photography Now 2017? What is the work about? Please describe one piece, the evolution of the concept, and the process?

The work is inspired by a variety of interests:

1.) My interest in photographing transparent objects, and being able to see something but not see it simultaneously.
2.) Paint as a material, using it to apply color to an object but also being aware of its physical presence.
3.) My interest in queering the body, and using the body simultaneously as a figurative and architectural element.

3. Much of the work in Photography Now 2017 seems to describe a distance between the subject and the viewer, a disconnection, and/or a dystopian situation. How do you think your work relates to these ideas?
I disagree with the first half of the statement: My work encourages viewers to become active participants. Objects, symbols, and other elements are used as entry points into an otherwise abstract tableaux. The tableaux deeper meaning the more the viewer is invested. In regards to dystopian situations, I think my work operates with a Heterotopian realm in which the spaces have more layers of meaning or relationships to other places than immediately meet the eye.

4. What are you working on now?
I am currently a resident in the Paul Robeson Express Newark Program at Rutgers Newark. During my fellowship, I am working on a series of small-scale transparent and translucent sculptures, while editing a series of photographs from a previous residency and also shooting new images included in the same series.

5. What is the one photograph you always wanted to make but never could?
I have always wanted to make photographs that were well over 100 inches like Andreas Gursky.

 


General exhibition information:

Photography Now 2017
November 4, 2017 – January 14, 2018
Juried by William Ewing

Featured Artists: Lars AndersonSarah AnthonyBen ArnonSandra BacchiJohn BarnardEmily BerlAdam Bernard, Christopher Paul Brown, Tianqiutao Chen, Jennifer Garza-CuenOrestes GonzalezTamar GranovskyAlejandro Loureiro LorenzoJeanette MayZora MurffLaurie PeekCeaphas Stubbs and Ayumi Tanaka.

See full exhibition information or exhibition guide (issuu.com).

PR: Kenro Izu Gallery Talk

Gallery Talk

 

Kenro Izu in Conversation with Howard Greenberg

Sunday, January 14, 2018, 2-4pm
at Aaron Rezny 76 Prince Street Studios in Kingston, NY

It has been over thirty years, since Kenro Izu first met gallerist Howard Greenberg, who had founded CPW just years before as the Catskill Center for Photography. Join us for a special afternoon at Aaron Rezny 76 Prince Street Studios in Kingston, NY, as Kenro and Howard talk about this creative partnership that has lasted decades. As Greenberg describes in the introduction of the book Kenro Izu. A Thirty Year Retrospective (Nazraeli Press, 2010), “I am certain that soon Kenro will reveal more extraordinary photographs; glorious images that only a mature, confident photographic artist can render. They will conjure up memories, triggered by over thirty years’ experience of knowing Kenro Izu and having his images imprinted in my mind. Thirty years of Kenro Izu’s world have changed, and enriched, my life forever.”

Press:

Poughkeepsie Journal, Linda Marston-Reid, “‘Sacred Places’ shows monuments to spiritual deities” (January 9, 2018)
B&H Photography Podcast, Allan Weitz, Food Photography and “Eating Delancey” (January 7, 2018)
Chronogram, Lynn Woods, “Kenro Izu: “Sacred Places” Exhibit in Aaron Rezny’s Kingston Studio” (January 1, 2018)
Kingston Radio 1490WKNY, “Center For Photography And Friends Visit The Italian Show On 1490WKNY Radio Kingston.ORG” (December 17, 2017)
Spectrum News Channel 6, “Center for Photography Fundraiser” (December 17, 2017)
Daily Freeman, Paul Kirby, “Warehouse in Midtown Kingston reborn as photo studio and gallery” (December 15, 2017)
Hudson Valley One, Doug Short, “Kenro Izu at the Center for Photography” (December 14, 2017)
Daily Freeman, Tania Baricklo, “Photos from Aaron Rezny 76 Prince Street Studios (December 14, 2017)

Special edition prints are still available. See details below.

Continue Reading...

This gallery talk is part of special programming and an exhibition featuring Kenro Izu’s exhibition Sacred Places, held at the newly inaugurated Aaron Rezny 76 Prince Street Studios in Kingston, NY. The exhibition may be viewed during the event, limited weekend hours and by appointment.

Please note that Kenro’s special edition print will be on sale during the event for the discounted price of $150 (regular price is $250).  Proceeds from the print edition benefit CPW’s artist programs, including exhibitions that on average draw an audience of 10,000 or more, the renowned artist-in-residence program, workshops, workspaces, lecture series and more.

Kingston Hours: Saturday, December 16, 2017, 3-6pm (reception); Sunday, December 17, 2017, noon – 4pm. 2018 weekend hours: January 6-7, 13-14, 20-21, 27-28, noon – 4pm.  Exhibition venue: 76 Prince Street, Kingston, NY. The exhibition is free and open to the public. To make a special appointment to visit the exhibition, please contact the Aaron Rezny Studio at (212) 691-1894.

Image at top: Fundraiser print, Kenro Izu, Hampi No. 15, India, 1996


Kenro Izu, Ayutthaya No. 36, Thailand, 1998

ABOUT THE SPECIAL PRINT EDITION:

Kenro Izo has generously made two prints available as a special edition to support CPW’s programs. The two images “Ayutthaya No. 36, Thailand, 1998″ and “Hampi No. 15, India, 1996″ speak to the timeless beauty of ancient Asian culture. The photographs are beautifully printed archivally in an edition of 50. The image size is 8 x 11-1/2″ on 11 x 14″ paper. The edition sells at a greatly discounted price of $250 per print, however, at the fundraising and special event they go on a super flash sale for $150 (online and at gallery). BUY YOUR PRINT NOW. The images can be purchased at 76 Prince Street Studios or at CPW during gallery hours, or any time from CPW’s online store (Hampi and Ayutthaya).

ABOUT THE ARTIST:

Kenro Izu (b. 1949) made his first trip to Egypt in 1979, which inspired him to begin his series Sacred Places, an exploration that is still in progress. Work on this series have taken Izu to Egypt, Syria, Jordan, England, Scotland, Mexico, France and Easter Island (Chile). More recently, he has focused on Buddhist and Hindu monuments in South East Asia: Cambodia, Burma, Indonesia, Vietnam and, most recently Bhutan and India.

Izu has been the recipient of the Catskill Center for Photography Fellowship in 1992, a NEA grant in 1984, the New York Foundation for Arts grant in 1985, the Lou Stouman Award in 1999, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2001, the Vision Award from the Center for Photography at Woodstock in 2005 and a Lucie Award in 2007.

A related exhibition, Eternal Light, by Kenro Izu is on view at Howard Greenberg Gallery through December 9.

PR: Kenro Izu Exhibition and Fundraiser

Exhibition Reception + Fundraiser

 

Kenro Izu: Sacred Places

Saturday, December 16, 2017, 3-6pm
at Aaron Rezny 76 Prince Street Studios in Kingston, NY

CPW is pleased to announce a fundraiser and collaborative exhibition reception featuring renowned photographer Kenro Izu. This special event will be held at the newly inaugurated Aaron Rezny 76 Prince Street Studios in Kingston, NY. Please join us as CPW celebrates this important photographer with an exhibition of his Sacred Places series.

The fundraiser will include the exhibition reception, flash sale of special edition prints, raffle and more. Rehabilitating an existing building, Aaron Rezny has created a state-of-the-art studio, sophisticated office and event space, and beautiful gallery at the heart of Kingston. Come see what the buzz is about and join us in a celebration of CPW, Kenro Izu and Aaron Rezny. The exhibition may be viewed during the event, limited weekend hours and by appointment. See our raffle sponsors below.

Continue Reading...

Proceeds from the special edition benefit CPW’s artist programs, including exhibitions that on average draw an audience of 10,000 or more, the renowned artist-in-residence program, workshops, workspaces, lecture series and more. CPW is a vital hub for dialogue and discovery in photography and related media, bringing together a diverse array of artists and a vibrant community with a strong artistic tradition.  Through its programs, CPW fosters opportunities to create and explore photography, and celebrate its role in contemporary culture.

Hours: Saturday, December 16, 2017, 3-6pm (reception); Sunday, December 17, 2017, noon – 4pm. 2018 weekend hours: January 6-7, 13-14, 20-21, 27-28, noon – 4pm.  Exhibition venue: 76 Prince Street, Kingston, NY. The exhibition is free and open to the public. To make a special appointment to visit the exhibition, please contact the Aaron Rezny Studio at (212) 691-1894.

Press:
Poughkeepsie Journal, Linda Marston-Reid, “‘Sacred Places’ shows monuments to spiritual deities” (January 9, 2018)
B&H Photography Podcast, Allan Weitz, Food Photography and “Eating Delancey” (January 7, 2018)
Chronogram, Lynn Woods, “Kenro Izu: “Sacred Places” Exhibit in Aaron Rezny’s Kingston Studio” (January 1, 2018)
Kingston Radio 1490WKNY, “Center For Photography And Friends Visit The Italian Show On 1490WKNY Radio Kingston.ORG” (December 17, 2017)
Spectrum News Channel 6, “Center for Photography Fundraiser” (December 17, 2017)
Daily Freeman, Paul Kirby, “Warehouse in Midtown Kingston reborn as photo studio and gallery” (December 15, 2017)
Hudson Valley One,Doug Short, “Kenro Izu at the Center for Photography” (December 14, 2017)
Daily Freeman, Tania Baricklo, “Photos from Aaron Rezny 76 Prince Street Studios (December 14, 2017)

Image at top: Fundraiser print, Kenro Izu, Hampi No. 15, India, 1996


Kenro Izu, Ayutthaya No. 36, Thailand, 1998

ABOUT THE SPECIAL PRINT EDITION:

Kenro Izo has generously made two prints available as a special edition to support CPW’s programs. The two images “Ayutthaya No. 36, Thailand, 1998″ and “Hampi No. 15, India, 1996″ speak to the timeless beauty of ancient Asian culture. The photographs are beautifully printed archivally in an edition of 50. The image size is 8 x 11-1/2″ on 11 x 14″ paper. The edition sells at a greatly discounted price of $250 per print, however, at the fundraising event they go on a super flash sale for $150 (online and at gallery – use coupon code HOLIDAY17). BUY YOUR PRINT NOW. The images can be purchased at 76 Prince Street Studios or at CPW during gallery hours, or any time from CPW’s online store (Hampi and Ayutthaya).

Support CPW and buy your print now

ABOUT THE ARTIST:

Kenro Izu (b. 1949) was born in Osaka, Japan.
 He studied at Nippon University and moved to New York in the 1970s. Once there, Izu built a career specialized in still life photography, both commercial and fine art. In 1979, Izu made his first trip to Egypt, which inspired him to begin his series Sacred Places, an exploration that is still in progress. Work on this series have taken Izu to Egypt, Syria, Jordan, England, Scotland, Mexico, France and Easter Island (Chile). More recently, he has focused on Buddhist and Hindu monuments in South East Asia: Cambodia, Burma, Indonesia, Vietnam and, most recently Bhutan and India.

Izu’s work has been exhibited in numerous museums including the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery of Smithsonian Institution, Kiyosato Museum of Photographic Art, Cleveland Museum of Art, Peabody/Essex Museum, Museum of Photographic Art, Rubin Museum of Art, among others. He has published several books of his work including: Sacred PlacesKenro Izu Still LifePassage to Angkor, and Eternal Light.

In 1985, after a several visit to Cambodia to photograph the Angkor Wat, Izu decided to build and operate a free pediatric hospital, and founded a not-for-profit organization, Friends Without A Border, to help children of Cambodia who suffer from lack of medical facilities and severe poverty. The Angkor Hospital for Children, which opened in 1999 in Siem Reap , Cambodia is now an official medical education center.

Izu has been the recipient of the Catskill Center for Photography Fellowship in 1992, a NEA grant in 1984, the New York Foundation for Arts grant in 1985, the Lou Stouman Award in 1999, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2001, the Vision Award from the Center for Photography at Woodstock in 2005 and a Lucie Award in 2007.

A related exhibition, Eternal Light, by Kenro Izu is on view at Howard Greenberg Gallery through December 9.

ABOUT AARON REZNY 76 PRINCE STREET STUDIOS:

For more than twenty years, Aaron Rezny has combined his talent and intense passion for food and still-life photography into an unparalleled collaborative experience with his clientele. Specializing in crisp, detailed lighting. and eminently edible appetite-appeal, his photographs have consistently surpassed the expectations of world-class editorial, advertising. and corporate clients. Rezny’s personal project, Eating Delancey, a series of images that represent the flavors of his youth in New York City, has been exhibited across the country and was expanded into a book by the same name. The publication includes images from the series, as well as personal food and neighborhood remembrances by major writers and other celebrities, namely, Joan Rivers, Milton Glaser and Lou Reed. Other fine-art projects include the series Candyland, Gameshow, Obsolete, and more.

RELATED EVENT: Join us on Sunday, January 14, 2018 at 2pm at the Aaron Rezny 76 Prince Street Studios in Kingston, NY for a special afternoon with artist Kenro Izu and gallerist Howard Greenberg. Having worked together for over thirty years, the two will discuss Izu’s epic artistic endeavor of capturing the human nature that connects ancient cultural sites with the present. As Greenberg describes in the introduction of the book Kenro Izu. A Thirty Year Retrospective (Nazraeli Press, 2010), “I am certain that soon Kenro will reveal more extraordinary photographs; glorious images that only a mature, confident photographic artist can render. They will conjure up memories, triggered by over thirty years’ experience of knowing Kenro Izu and having his images imprinted in my mind. Thirty years of Kenro Izu’s world have changed, and enriched, my life forever.”

THANK YOU!! Our event sponsors are amazing. Our warmest thanks to Howard Greenberg Gallery, Kenro Izu, Aaron Rezny 76 Prince Street Studios, Abbe Does It and  Herzog’s Home & Paint. Additional raffle sponsors include Birch Body Care Kingston, Boitson’s, Cheri Voss Hair, Courtyard by Marriott Kingston, Eyeist, Garden Cafe, Jack Studio Rentals, John Carroll Healer, Lily Pickford, Monkey Joe Roasting Company, Naturopath Vital Health, Phase One, SQ – Travel By Design LLC, Stone Soup Food Company, Woodstock Framing Gallery, and Woodstock Golf Club. Thank you so much for your contributions to the event, the raffle and other support.

PR: Fionn Reilly Book Signing and Gallery Talk

Fionn Reilly: Kolkata Calcutta

Book signing and Gallery Talk
Saturday, December 9, 2017, 3-5pm

CPW is pleased to announce a book signing and gallery talk to celebrate Fionn Reilly’s new book Kolkata Calcutta (KMW Studio Publishing, 2017). As part of the event, special guest Tony Fletcher, who wrote the foreword for the book, will be discussing Reilly’s compelling photo series with the artist.

ABOUT THE BOOK: Kolkata Calcutta is a collection of black-and-white and color photographs taken in what Fionn Reilly refers to as “of one the World’s most enthralling and mysterious cities as revealed through the lens of photographer.”

Inspired by the films of Kolkata’s celebrated director Satyajit Ray and the great Indian photographer Raghubir Singh, Reilly’s images capture an intense city that exudes a true sense of soul, haunted by it’s ghosts of empire. Primary among this volume are Reilly’s candid shots of everyday people in pursuit of their everyday business, religious and cultural icons, historical architecture, and open spaces.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Fionn Reilly is a London born professional photographer living in upstate New York. He studied at London College of Printing. His portrait work has been featured internationally in publications such as the New York Times, L.A Times, iD Magazine, Italian Vogue, Esquire, Spanish GQ, and Prison Life Magazine of which he was also Art Director.

Copies of the book will be available for purchase at the book signing. The book may be previewed online at www.kolkatabook.com

PR: Purchase Award 2017

Announcing the 2017 Purchase Award Recipient: SARAH ANTHONY

The Center for Photography at Woodstock (CPW) is pleased to announce the 2017 Purchase Award. This year’s recipient is Boston-based artist Sarah Anthony, whose projects focus on masculinity, coming of age, gender, romance and human relationships. The Purchase Award, which is part of the annual Photography Now exhibition, includes a CPW Advanced Membership with one-on-one portfolio review session. The award is chosen annually by Executive Director Hannah Frieser.

About the Artist: Sarah Anthony received her BFA in Photography from Syracuse University in 2013. She works in photography, creative writing and performative mediums. Her photography has been exhibited internationally, most recently at the exhibition DOPE in Seoul, Korea. She is based in Boston, MA, and works as a photo editor and educator. Her work can be viewed at www.sarahanthonyphoto.com

Artist Statement: For the past four years I have photographed a group of boys as they navigate their adolescence. During this period I have watched as the boys attempt to cross the threshold into adulthood. The photographs I create emphasize the push and pull of their bodies and their mindsets. The subjects still emit the delicacy associated with youth, though simultaneously they fight to be the hard and masculine person they think they should be. As this project has developed, I have asked each boy I have photographed if they have had trouble adjusting themselves to better fit what they understand to be the definition of manhood. Each has admitted that they have struggled with shedding aspects of their youth, mainly having to do with the freedom to express their emotions. As a society we are generally taught to ignore this struggle. This practiced ignorance reinforces the idea that young men must deal with this process on their own. In fact, it is the ability to quietly endure this process that serves as the ultimate marker in the achievement of manhood. By posing the boys in slightly feminine positions, I exacerbate their inner struggle and play with ideas of vulnerability, masculinity, and youth. The images subtly challenge the viewer to acknowledge the inner struggle the boys experience.

 

Photography Now 2017, juried by William Ewing, is on view at CPW through January 14, 2018. The exhibition features artists Lars Anderson, Sarah Anthony, Ben Arnon, Sandra Jonas Bacchi, John Barnard, Adam Bernard, Emily Berl, Christopher Brown, Tianqiutao Chen, Jennifer Garza-Cuen, Orestes Gonzalez, Tamar Granovsky, Alejandro Loureiro Lorenzo, Jeanette May, Zora Murff, Laurie Peek, Ceaphas Stubbs and Ayumi Tanaka.

Image information: Sarah Anthony, Deven in the Snow, 2016

The call for entry for Photography Now 2018 is now available. Apply by January 29, 2018. The show will take place in late fall.