(left) Matthew Brandt, "Charles", 2007, from the "Portraits" series, unique salted paper print with his mucus, 5 7/8 x 6 3/4". Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York City. (right) Matthew Brandt, "Loveland Reservoir", CA 7, 2011, from the series "Lakes and Reservoirs", unique chromogenic print soaked in Loveland Reservoir water, 30x40". Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York City.

(left) Matthew Brandt, “Charles”, 2007, from the “Portraits” series, unique salted paper print with his mucus, 5 7/8 x 6 3/4″. Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York City.
(right) Matthew Brandt, “Loveland Reservoir”, CA 7, 2011, from the series “Lakes and Reservoirs”, unique chromogenic print soaked in Loveland Reservoir water, 30×40″. Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York City.

Matthew Brandt

In the series entitled Portraits, I photographed close childhood friends and family in Los Angeles. Each salted paper print was made with the subject’s own bodily fluids to chemically produce the image. For example, a picture of my friend Will was printed with his tears as the salt content to

produce his portrait. The size of the print ended up being very small due to the preciousness of the fluid as the size of each print is determined by how much fluid my subjects end up giving me. I have always been interested in this territory of photographic representation and how the image reacts with the real.

– partially excerpted from an interview with Fred Paginton from Dazed Digital, July 2011

The process of the Lakes and Reservoirs project is fairly simple – I visit a lake or reservoir, I photograph it and collect water from it, then make a C-print of this photograph and soak it in the water that was collected. The outcome is the reaction of the image of this lake or reservoir that has been soaked in its own water over a period of time, from days to weeks or even months. During this period, the water breaks down the layers of color that make the image, leaving degraded C-prints that not only reflect how a photographic subject meets its image, but act as a metaphor for the degraded technology of color negative printing. Although I knew in the back of my mind that these images were to later be degraded, I still sought out the “best” shot I could get by hiking to the tops of hills, going into stranger’s balconies, waiting for the sun, etc. I enjoy the perversity in subverting all this photographic labor by later degrading it with the lake water. The images are circumstances of a lake’s image that meets its real substance.

– partially excerpted from an interview with Fred Paginton from Dazed Digital, July 2011

Matthew Brandt (Los Angeles, CA) received his MFA from the University of California at Los Angeles in 2008. Solo exhibitions have been presented at venues such as M&B Gallery (Los Angeles, CA) and the Cardwell Jimmerson Gallery (Culver City, CA). His work has been featured in group exhibitions at the Fotofest 2010 Biennial and Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, among others. Brandt’s work is in the collections of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Armand Hammer Museum (Los Angeles, CA). His photographs have been featured and reviewed in publications such as LA Weekly and The New Yorker. In 2012, he was featured in Forbes Magazine in a list of Top 30 Under 30 in Art & Design by Jeffrey Deitch and Chuck Close. His work is represented by M&B Gallery and Yossi Milo Gallery.

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