Lucinda Devlin, "Lethal Injection Chamber, Nevada State Prison, Carson City Nevada", 1991, C-print, courtesy of Paul Rodgers/9W Gallery, NYC.

Lucinda Devlin, “Lethal Injection Chamber, Nevada State Prison, Carson City Nevada”, 1991, C-print, courtesy of Paul Rodgers/9W Gallery, NYC.

Lucinda Devlin

The Omega Suites

My work as an artist has explored contemporary American culture through the psychologically complex domain of interior spaces. I have found that spatial settings can provide unique cultural readings on how spaces, objects and artifacts can construct meaning. I explore these ideas through series of pictures that collectively define many of the mores, values or beliefs of large segments of the American culture. I feel the photographs contain rich layers of information enabling them to be viewed and interpreted in numerous ways. The activities carried out in The Omega Suites require the ultimate in passivity, which brought me to execution rooms. I found a great similarity between the spaces designed for healing and those designed for killing. These pictures were not intended as a polemic against the death penalty but as the project took on a life of its own I became totally obsessed with this world of execution. And so I set out to find out all I could about the people and institutions and the accoutrements and rituals of this death work.

Lucinda Devlin ( Indianapolis , IN ) is a photographer who for many years has focused on exploring contemporary culture through the complex domain of interior space. Her series such as Pleasure Ground, Water Rites, and The Omega Suites provide unique cultural readings on how spaces, objects and artifacts can construct meaning. Devlin’s work has received many awards, including an Individual Artists Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Photographers’ Fellowship Fund from The Center for Photography at Woodstock , and has been exhibited worldwide including the 2001 Venice Biennale and the 25th Sao Paolo Biennale.